Mission Statement

Acknowledging that addiction and associated co-occurring disorders are diseases of denial and deception, Intervention Success strives to provide hope and practical solutions for families and friends concerned for the well-being of a suffering relative or friend.  Further, Intervention Success strives to awaken hope and a way out toward a solution for the relative and friend suffering from addiction, depression and other co-occurring disorders.

 

Our Mission is to provide the most effective, evidence-based intervention and treatment services for clients and their families so that everyone may reclaim their lives and live their lives fully.

Qualifications

Stephen B. Timmer, JD, CAS, BRI-1, NCIP

Intervention Qualifications

  • OVER 120 Interventions conducted successfully without one failure – everyone successfully entering a treatment program.

  • Licensed by the State of Florida as Certified Addiction Specialist.

  • Board Registered Interventionist - Level I – BRI-1

  • Nationally Certified Intervention Practitioner – NCIP – 1

  • ARISE CAI Intervention Training.

  • Insured by professional liability carrier in the amount of US $3 million.

  • A graduate of the University of Florida - College of Law with Juris Doctor degree.

  • A graduate of Eckerd College with a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and International studies.

  • A graduate of Stonebridge Colleges with a diploma in Substance Abuse Counseling with distinction.

  • Member - National Association of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC).

  • Member - National Association of Drug and Alochol Interventionists.

  • Member - Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association (FADAA).

  • Multi-Lingual - Spanish, French, Portuguese, and Japaense.

 

Code of Ethics

Code of Ethics – Association of Intervention Specialists

The Association of Intervention Specialists (AIS) has promulgated the following Code of Ethics to which I and all other professional interventionists agree to adhere:

 

Code of Ethics

All members adhere to the AIS Code of Ethics as reproduced below:

PRINCIPLE 1: Non-Discrimination

The intervention specialist must not discriminate against clients, organizations, or other professionals based on race, religion, color, age, sex, sexual orientation, mental or physical handicap, national origin or economic condition.

 

 

 

PRINCIPLE 2: Competence

The intervention specialist must recognize that this profession is founded on standards of competence which promotes the best interest of the client, the intervention specialist, this profession, and society. The intervention specialist must accept the need for ongoing education as an integral part of professional competence. The intervention specialist must recognize the boundaries and limitations of one’s own competencies, and not offer services or use techniques outside of these professional competencies. The intervention specialist must recognize the effect of physical and mental impairment on professional performance, and be willing to seek appropriate treatment for oneself or for a colleague.

PRINCIPLE 3: Legal and Ethical Standards

The intervention specialist must uphold the legal and accepted ethical codes which pertain to professional conduct. The intervention specialist must not use the affiliation with the Association of Intervention Specialists for purposes that are not consistent with the stated mission of the Association.* The intervention specialist who is aware of unethical or illegal professional conduct must report such violations to the appropriate certifying authority.

PRINCIPLE 4: Client Welfare

The intervention specialist must respect the integrity and protect the welfare of the person or group with whom the specialist is working. The intervention specialist must assume the responsibility for clients’ welfare either by termination by mutual agreement and/or by the client becoming engaged with another professional.

PRINCIPLE 5: Confidentiality

The intervention specialist must embrace, as a primary obligation, the privacy of clients and must not disclose confidential information acquired in teaching, clinical practice, training or consultation sessions, except when there is a clear and imminent danger to client or other persons.

PRINCIPLE 6: Societal Obligations

The intervention specialist must adopt a personal and professional stance which promotes the well-being of all human beings. The intervention specialist must inform the public through active civic and professional participation in community affairs of the effect of addiction, and must act to guarantee all persons, especially the needy and disadvantaged, have access to necessary resources and services.

PRINCIPLE 7: Remuneration

The intervention specialist must establish arrangements in professional practice which are in accord with the professional standards that safeguard the best interest of the client, the specialist and the profession. The intervention specialist may not exploit relationships with clients or patients for personal advantage or satisfaction. The intervention specialist will not accept direct enumeration for making or receiving a referral of a patient.

 

What is an Interventionist?

What is an Interventionist? The interventionist is the individual who helps people suffering from addiction or unhealthy behaviors and their friends and family find an apprpriate solution.  The solution may be to go to a formal treatment program, counseling, or 12 step group.  The Interventionist helps the individual and family to accept treatment and recovery. The interventionist supports, educates, and provides guidance, direction and training, as well as the actual intervention and aftercare.

 

Primary objectives – One of the primary objectives of an Interventionist is to assist the family and support members confront a person in non-threatening way and to allow them to see how self-destructive behavior, and how it affects themselves, family and friends.  The Intervention usually involves several people who are prepared to talk to a person who has been engaging in some sort of self-destructive behavior. In a clear and respectful way, they inform the person of factual information regarding his or her behavior and how it may have affected them. The immediate objective of an interventionist is for the person bent on self-destruction to listen and to accept help from all who care.

 

It can be challenging to help a loved one struggling with alcoholism, drug problems, eating disorders, prescription drug abuse, compulsive gambling or other destructive behavior. Sometimes a direct, heart-to-heart conversation with the guidance of an interventionist can start the road to recovery. At other times there may be need a more focused approach. Joining forces with others and taking action with an interventionist in a formal intervention process is a necessity. Those who struggle with addictive behaviors and their family/friends are often in denial about their situation and are unwilling to seek treatment. An intervention and interventionist presents all involved a structured supported opportunity to make changes before things get even worse. A professional interventionist is able to plan an intervention that is a planned process involving family and friends and sometimes colleagues, clergy members or others who care about a person struggling with addiction so they become an integral part of the recovery process.

 

It can be challenging to help a loved one struggling with alcoholism, drug problems, eating disorders, prescription drug abuse, compulsive gambling or other destructive behavior. Sometimes a direct, heart-to-heart conversation with the guidance of an interventionist can start the road to recovery. At other times there may be need a more focused approach. Joining forces with others and taking action with an interventionist in a formal intervention process is a necessity. Those who struggle with addictive behaviors and their family/friends are often in denial about their situation and are unwilling to seek treatment. An intervention and interventionist presents all involved a structured supported opportunity to make changes before things get even worse. A professional interventionist is able to plan an intervention that is a planned process involving family and friends and sometimes colleagues, clergy members or others who care about a person struggling with addiction so they become an integral part of the recovery process.

What an Interventionist is not?

We work to meet a client where they are in the process of change to explore the relationship between themselves, their world, and their addiction-related issues. In working closely with people suffering with addiction, we have witnessed countless failed attempts to intervene on someone struggling with addiction. An interventionist is not a moral policeman, a punisher, a judge, or even an advocate. An interventionist uses an evidence-based approach to enhancing the probability of a successful intervention. interventions achieve and how they work.

When you engage a Professional Interventionist, the Intervention is:

 

  • Not coercive.

  • Not shame-based.

  • Not hurtful or angry.

  • Not an ambush or an uncaring attack.

 

It is a planned interaction between an individual and a group whose sole purpose is to modify the individual’s dependence on a harmful substance or practice.

It is a process of invitation, education and preparing family and friends who make the commitment to initiate change in a loved one’s or coworker’s life.

The goal is to return to healthy, productive living for addicts and their families.

The truth is that Intervention is a process founded on love and honesty.

 

What Happens at the Intervention?

It is life-changing for everyone – neither the afflicted Intervention Subject (“IS”) is ever the same after the intervention.

 

Generally, all the interventions in which I have participated, share several common characteristics:

  • Everyone is nervous about what’s going to happen.

  • The afflicted Intervention Subject is usually on his or her best behavior because he or she is embarrassed and afraid.

  • A good intervention starts out tense, but the mood generally goes to relief, optimism, and hope.

  • The family and friends feel empowered and so does the IS because they have taken responsibility for themselves by taking action.

  • Things that everyone knew or believed are being disclosed and spoken about publicly for the first time which demonstrates that secrets keep us sick and releasing them releases their power.

  • Life as it was before, with quiet worry and desperation, is never the same. Life becomes a new adventure with excitement, joy, and peace.

 What is Addiction?

What is addiction?

Addiction is generally a habitual mental and physical dependence on a substance or a behavior that an individual seems to be unable to stop or control despite negative consequences.  Addictions that are most common are addictions to drugs (illegal and prescription), alcohol, gambling, smoking, and shopping.  Eating disorders are often grouped in with addiction, such as bulimia and anorexia, because the individual is usually unable to change without comprehensive intervention and treatment.

A person with an addiction usually has 3 or more of the following:

Signs and Symptoms of Addiction:

  • A tolerance for the substance or practice that requires increasing amounts to achieve the same effect.

  • Strong cravings for the substance or practice.

  • Being unable to stop using the substance or practice without going through withdrawal.

  • Loss of control over frequency and amounts of drug or substance usage.

  • Preoccupation with the substance or practice.

  • Inability to meet obligations to family, job, or other personal interests because of the substance or practice.

  • Physical or psychological deterioration due to use of the substance or practice.

Addiction is a disease affecting everyone in the family, even if only one individual is engaging in the use or abuse of substances or addictive behaviors.

What Our Clients Say About Us

What do our clients say about us? We have included some testimonials to give you an idea of what they think.

 

“Our son was 50 years old and had been drinking his whole life so much that he could not even walk.  We told Steve that he would never go to treatment. Steve talked to him for 10 minutes and he was so drunk, we were not even sure if he understood Steve, but in less than an hour, they were on their way to detox.”

– Mother of 50 year old alcoholic who is now sober for four years, from Florida.

 

“My wife could not stop drinking. When she was drunk, she was out of control.  For some reason, she would listen to Steve and would go with him no matter what”

– Husband of 65 year old alcoholic, from Michigan.

 

 

“We weren’t sure our son was an addict, but we went to meetings and we called three different interventionists – Steve was the only one who fly into Pennsylvania the night before the intervention, meet with the entire family and participants of the intervention, and then he would accompany our son to treatment in California.”

– Parents of 28 year old addict who is now clean over three years, from Pennsylvania.

 

“My fiancé was addicted to pain medication and stealing it from friends and family.  She was furious about the need to get help, but within two weeks, she was so grateful for treatment, she agreed to stay for 90 days.  I could never have done it without Steve.” 

- This couple is now married happily for five years, from Kentucky.

 

“Hey Steve. How’s it going!? I just want to thank you SO MUCH for sending me out to XXXXXXX, it has saved my life and things are going amazing! I'm coming home for a visit on the 1st of May for 3 days. First time in 7 months! I have 6 1/2 months sobriety. My family is healed back. I get along with my mom now and they are starting to trust me again and things are just going amazing! Send any person who struggles out to XXXXXXXXXXX!  Both you and them have saved my life.  If it weren't for you, I don't know where I would be today!” 

– Facebook message from 19 year old addict in recovery, from California.

“My husband was an abusive drunk and I was afraid for years.  Steve got him to treatment.  He did not stay sober sadly.  But I finally got my life back thanks to the therapy he gave me.” 

- 41 year old ex-wife of chronic alcoholic. Client did go to treatment, and as soon as he left, he unfortunately began drinking again. Although this client returned to drinking, sometimes treatment's most significant impact is on the loved ones of the client.

 

“My husband drank daily and was killing himself.  He threatened Steve and Steve calmly told him to sit down and talk. Within 15 minutes, he was crying on Steve’s shoulder. I will always be grateful for Steve saving his life and our family.” 

– Wife of 61 year old alcoholic, from Pennsylvania.

 

“Our son started with marijuana, and then pills, and then began shooting heroin.  I asked him if there was anyone in treatment that he would listen to.  He said he would listen to Steve Timmer.  I called Steve and he flew up to Massachusetts the next day. He brought our son to two different treatment programs and three to four detox facilities. He just would not give up on our son.”

– Father of 29 year old ex-heroin addict. His son now plans to enroll in law school this fall.